Palouse Pediatrics has offices in both Pullman, Washington and Moscow Idaho

Health Care for Infants, Children and Adolescents

 

We understand that as a parent, your child is undoubtedly the most important part of your life. We also understand that your child’s medical care is of the greatest importance to you. We strive to maintain a high quality of service, and as a pediatric office, we hold ourselves to a different set of standards.

Our goal is not only to be available to meet the needs of your family, on your schedule, but to take a vested interest in both you and your child.

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When making appointments at our office, you are always free to choose which doctor you would like to see within the limits of the scheduling. Whenever one doctor is not in the office, another doctor will see all the patients who need to be seen.

Patients are seen by appointment only, however, if you have an emergency, please call and we will instruct you on how to proceed. We strive to see all children that need to be seen before we close each day.

 

Meet our New Provider

Maricarmen Shields, MD


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Palouse Pediatrics complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.
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Find the latest news & information on our Facebook page.

You guys, it’s that time of the year! ☀️

School is getting our, your summer plans are packed and your pediatricians office is past the flu rush and not quite to the sports physical rush of August.

Aka, schedule now!

Also, did you know that a large proportion (up to 30% or more in some areas) of school aged kids and adolescents are NOT getting yearly well visits and preventive care that is recommended? These are missed opportunities

Why yearly well care? Why do I think it is important and vital?

Prevention! Prevention! Prevention!

It all boils down to wanting to catch things before they are a problem and partnering with you to keep your healthy child healthy.

This is a time where your child is not only undergoing rapid physical growth, but also maturing emotionally and experiencing significant hormonal changes.

We want to...

✔️ Measure and track growth to ensure no excessive weight loss, weight gain or abnormal patterns. We can screen for obesity, body image concerns, eating disorders, short stature and more. Example: If you show up at age 13 with a child who has already gone through puberty and started periods, but has short stature - you have completely missed your window of being able to intervene.

✔️ Screen for scoliosis which can worsen rapidly and go undetected during the years of rapid pubertal growth, and can eventually lead to pain and deformity.

✔️ Check on development. When your kiddo is little this may mean speech or motor skills. As they mature, this may also mean pubertal development. We can talk about timing of these changes, what to expect, and let you know when things aren’t progressing as expected.

✔️ Screen lipids/cholesterol and blood pressure to help identify higher risk for cardiovascular issues.

✔️ Ensure they are fit for sports and high intensity exercise from a musculoskeletal, cardiac and lung perspective - as well as no contraindications to something like recurrent or recent concussion.

✔️ Make sure bodily functions are working like they should. Poop can literally end you up in the ER if things aren’t “going” as they should. Periods can be a true PAIN or even lead to anemia, missed school and emotional distress if irregular, heavy and painful.

✔️ Walk you through other expected changes in the teen years. Separating identities from parents, circadian rhythm and sleep changes, peer issues, school and academic pressures increasing, etc.

✔️ Mental health screening for when your cranky teen becomes more than that. Primary care doctors are the front lines of mental health care and a simple in-office screen for depression can save thousands of lives a year by properly identifying a disorder and getting teens the help they need. Early detection can reduce severity, have an immediate impact and reduce suicide - which is the number 2 cause of death in adolescent.

✔️ Provide your child or teen another trusted adult that they can confide in and allow them time to get to know us when things are going smoothly. This way when something happens, they already know and trust us.

✔️ Help your teen learn to take charge of their own health and into a routine of prevention and responsibility. Allow them to fill out their forms, ask their own questions and get more confident about their body.

✔️ Sexual health screening. Discuss safety, STD and pregnancy protection. Gonorrhea and chlamydia are rising exponentially in the teen population over the last several years, is often asymptomatic and can have serious consequences such as infertility.

✔️ Discussing safety concerns. Everything from internet, social media, texting and driving, drugs/alcohol, and more.

💕 Dr. Katie
...

You guys, it’s that time of the year! ☀️

School is getting our, your summer plans are packed and your pediatricians office is past the flu rush and not quite to the sports physical rush of August. 

Aka, schedule now! 

Also, did you know that a large proportion (up to 30% or more in some areas) of school aged kids and adolescents are NOT getting yearly well visits and preventive care that is recommended? These are missed opportunities 

Why yearly well care? Why do I think it is important and vital?

Prevention! Prevention! Prevention! 

It all boils down to wanting to catch things before they are a problem and partnering with you to keep your healthy child healthy. 

This is a time where your child is not only undergoing rapid physical growth, but also maturing emotionally and experiencing significant hormonal changes. 

We want to...

✔️ Measure and track growth to ensure no excessive weight loss, weight gain or abnormal patterns. We can screen for obesity, body image concerns, eating disorders, short stature and more. Example: If you show up at age 13 with a child who has already gone through puberty and started periods, but has short stature - you have completely missed your window of being able to intervene. 

✔️ Screen for scoliosis which can worsen rapidly and go undetected during the years of rapid pubertal growth, and can eventually lead to pain and deformity. 

✔️ Check on development. When your kiddo is little this may mean speech or motor skills. As they mature, this may also mean pubertal development. We can talk about timing of these changes, what to expect, and let you know when things aren’t progressing as expected. 

✔️ Screen lipids/cholesterol and blood pressure to help identify higher risk for cardiovascular issues. 

✔️ Ensure they are fit for sports and high intensity exercise from a musculoskeletal, cardiac and lung perspective - as well as no contraindications to something like recurrent or recent concussion. 

✔️ Make sure bodily functions are working like they should. Poop can literally end you up in the ER if things aren’t “going” as they should. Periods can be a true PAIN or even lead to anemia, missed school and emotional distress if irregular, heavy and painful. 

✔️ Walk you through other expected changes in the teen years. Separating identities from parents, circadian rhythm and sleep changes, peer issues, school and academic pressures increasing, etc. 

✔️ Mental health screening for when your cranky teen becomes more than that. Primary care doctors are the front lines of mental health care and a simple in-office screen for depression can save thousands of lives a year by properly identifying a disorder and getting teens the help they need. Early detection can reduce severity, have an immediate impact and reduce suicide - which is the number 2 cause of death in adolescent. 

✔️ Provide your child or teen another trusted adult that they can confide in and allow them time to get to know us when things are going smoothly. This way when something happens, they already know and trust us. 

✔️ Help your teen learn to take charge of their own health and into a routine of prevention and responsibility. Allow them to fill out their forms, ask their own questions and get more confident about their body. 

✔️ Sexual health screening. Discuss safety, STD and pregnancy protection. Gonorrhea and chlamydia are rising exponentially in the teen population over the last several years, is often asymptomatic and can have serious consequences such as infertility. 

✔️ Discussing safety concerns. Everything from internet, social media, texting and driving, drugs/alcohol, and more. 

💕 Dr. Katie

 

Comment on Facebook

Shocked! Most insurance plans cover well visits!! We are scheduled!!

+ View previous comments

“I didn’t know they could rear face that long!”

I got so many questions and comments recently when I posted about turning my 4 year old around. So...

Let’s talk #carseatsafety!

First and foremost, putting your child in a car is one of the most dangerous things you do each day. And each car seat progression or milestone puts your kid at higher risk, particularly when done too early. This is not like saying their first words. There is no reason to rush it, and actually a lot of downsides in terms of their safety.

The longer you can keep them rear-facing in particular, the better! Why is that? Children have disproportionally large heads in relation to their bodies (like adorable little bobble heads) and less developed cervical spines. This is a recipe for a very serious neck injury in the event of car accident when not properly supported.

You do not need to flip them around for squished up legs, sitting cross legged is more comfy looking than legs dangling anyways. You do not need to turn them around at 1 year old or 20 lbs. Not even at 2 years old! You do not need to turn them around when they outgrow their infant seat - there are so many great convertible seats with really high weight and height limits now.

You only need to turn them around when they outgrow those limits. That’s it. Buy a convertible seat with a high limit (google carseat lady and rear facing to see recs of ones with highest limits), know it, and turn them around when they hit it. Easy peasy.

The AAP also recommends:

• Once they are facing forward, children should use a forward-facing car safety seat with a 5-pt harness for as long as possible, until they reach the height and weight limits for their seats and are mature enough to sit still and not wiggle! Many seats can accommodate children up to 65 pounds or more.

• When children exceed these limits, they should use a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle’s lap and shoulder seat belt fits properly - on the hip bones (not belly) and across upper sternum (not neck). This is often when they have reached at least 4 feet 9 inches in height and are 8 to 12 years old.

What else can I answer?
#pediatricianmom #safetyfirst #rearfacingsaveslives #extendedrearfacing #themoreyouknow #safekids #americanacademyofpediatrics
...

“I didn’t know they could rear face that long!”

I got so many questions and comments recently when I posted about turning my 4 year old around. So...

Let’s talk #carseatsafety!

First and foremost, putting your child in a car is one of the most dangerous things you do each day. And each car seat progression or milestone puts your kid at higher risk, particularly when done too early. This is not like saying their first words. There is no reason to rush it, and actually a lot of downsides in terms of their safety.

The longer you can keep them rear-facing in particular, the better! Why is that? Children have disproportionally large heads in relation to their bodies (like adorable little bobble heads) and less developed cervical spines. This is a recipe for a very serious neck injury in the event of car accident when not properly supported. 

You do not need to flip them around for squished up legs, sitting cross legged is more comfy looking than legs dangling anyways. You do not need to turn them around at 1 year old or 20 lbs. Not even at 2 years old! You do not need to turn them around when they outgrow their infant seat - there are so many great convertible seats with really high weight and height limits now. 

You only need to turn them around when they outgrow those limits. That’s it. Buy a convertible seat with a high limit (google carseat lady and rear facing to see recs of ones with highest limits), know it, and turn them around when they hit it. Easy peasy.

The AAP also recommends:

• Once they are facing forward, children should use a forward-facing car safety seat with a 5-pt harness for as long as possible, until they reach the height and weight limits for their seats and are mature enough to sit still and not wiggle! Many seats can accommodate children up to 65 pounds or more.

• When children exceed these limits, they should use a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle’s lap and shoulder seat belt fits properly - on the hip bones (not belly) and across upper sternum (not neck). This is often when they have reached at least 4 feet 9 inches in height and are 8 to 12 years old.

What else can I answer?
#pediatricianmom #safetyfirst #rearfacingsaveslives #extendedrearfacing #themoreyouknow #safekids #americanacademyofpediatrics

 

Comment on Facebook

Are there any recommendations on how tight you should pull the straps? My 2 year old is rear facing but screams it’s too tight when I can only fit about one finger between his shoulders and the strap.

Good read. This isn’t Finley is it??

Fighting this battle with my very independent (almost) 2 year old. His new MO is toe scream when he’s the the car seat. He’s only 27 pounds and out goal is rear facing until we hit the limits of the car seat but traveling with him is a pain right now. Suggestions?

+ View previous comments

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